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Perpetuating American Traditions for Future Generations

“A date which will live in infamy..”

“A date which will live in infamy..”

On this date 72 years ago  the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and launched attacks on Malaya, Hong Kong, Guam, Philippine Islands, Wake Island and on the 8th of December attacked Midway Island.  On 8th December President Franklin Delano Roosevelt gave one of his most important  addresses to the congress, opening with these not to be forgotten words ~~ “Yesterday, December 7, 1941 – a date which will live in infamy – the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan…”

A memorial reflection on yesterday’s history,  the Ticonderoga Historical Society,  provides a photographic reflection of the terrible destruction that fell upon our air and naval forces at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 and remembers our local servicemen that were there..

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Our veterans’ files note several Essex County service men that were at Pearl Harbor on that fateful day:  Frederick Gubania, Seaman 1/c, Ticonderoga, killed in action: Frank J. Java, Lt. USN, Mineville; Stanley Kordziel, USN, Seaman 2/c, Witherbee; Karlton S. Ross. Corp US Marines, Crown Point; Burnell Ross, USN serving aboard the submarine USS Triton, killed in action; three brothers: Malcolm, Leroy, Randolph Barber, sailors serving aboard the USS Oklahoma, Keeseville, listed in January, 1942 “as missing in action.”  Robert Cumms, Whallonsburg, served aboard the USS West Virginia and Woodrow Willard, Moriah, S/Sgt.   ( These names were compiled from articles in our local newspapers of the time.  No servicemen’s photographs or service records available.)

Veterans,  and currently serving service men and women,  photographs and records are welcomed.   Donation of military related items are appreciated.

The USS Cassin (DD-372) that was destroyed in dry dock on December 7th has an important local connection.  This destroyer, the second to be so named, was named after  Captain Stephen Cassin, ” whose remarkable service while captain of the USS Ticonderoga (The first so named) at the Battle of Lake Champlain (Plattsburgh) during the War of 1812, was awarded a Congressional gold medal.  The remaining timbers still can be seen at Whitehall, NY.

USS Cassin (DD372) 1937

USS Cassin (DD372) 1937

Remembering those that have served and those who are serving during this Holiday Season.

American flag still flying over Hickman Field

American flag still flying over Hickman Field

Photographs from official naval sources.

 

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